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teaching Sandra M. Troian

Winter 2015 - Caltech
Tues, Thurs and Fri 1:00-2:25 pm APh/Ph 115
Watson 104 Physics of Momentum Transport in Hydrodynamic Systems
12 units (3-0-9); first term
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent
 
Contemporary research in many areas of physics requires some knowledge of the principles governing hydrodynamic phenomena such as nonlinear wave propagation, symmetry breaking in pattern forming systems, phase transitions in simple and complex fluids, Langevin dynamics, sliding friction in nanoscale systems, micro- and optofluidic control, biological transport, and life at low Reynolds number. This course offers students of pure and applied physics a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of momentum transport in hydrodynamic systems. We introduce analysis techniques based on formalized dimensional analysis and rescaling, asymptotic analysis to identify dominant force balances, similitude, self-similarity and regular perturbation analysis for examining unidirectional and creeping flows, pulsatile flows, capillary phenomena, oscillating bubbles, spreading films, surface gravity waves, oscillatory flows, and linearly unstable flows leading to pattern formation. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs, complex variables and basic tensor analysis. Advanced solution methods will be taught in class as needed.
Spring 2014 - Caltech
Tues & Thurs 1:00-2:25 pm APh/Ph/Ae 116
Watson 104 Physics of Thermal and Mass Transport in Hydrodynamic Systems
12 units (3-0-9); second term
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent; APh/Ph 115 or equivalent
 
Contemporary research in many areas of physics requires some knowledge of how convective transport in fluids couples to diffusive phenomena driven by thermal or concentration gradients. This course will first examine processes driven purely by diffusion and progress toward description of systems governed by steady and unsteady convection-diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations. Topics will include Fickian dynamics, thermal transfer in Peltier devices, Lifshitz-Slyozov growth during phase separation, thermocouple measurements of oscillatory fields, reaction-diffusion phenomena in biophysical systems, buoyancy driven flows, and boundary layer formation. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs, complex variables and basic tensor analysis. Advanced solution methods such as singular perturbation, Sturm-Liouville and Green's function analysis will be taught in class as needed.
Winter 2014 - Caltech
Tues, Thurs and Fri 1:00-2:25 pm APh/Ph 115
Watson 104 Physics of Momentum Transport in Hydrodynamic Systems
12 units (3-0-9); first term
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent
 
Contemporary research in many areas of physics requires some knowledge of the principles governing hydrodynamic phenomena such as nonlinear wave propagation, symmetry breaking in pattern forming systems, phase transitions in simple and complex fluids, Langevin dynamics, sliding friction in nanoscale systems, micro- and optofluidic control, biological transport, and life at low Reynolds number. This course offers students of pure and applied physics a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of momentum transport in hydrodynamic systems. We introduce analysis techniques based on formalized dimensional analysis and rescaling, asymptotic analysis to identify dominant force balances, similitude, self-similarity and regular perturbation analysis for examining unidirectional and creeping flows, pulsatile flows, capillary phenomena, oscillating bubbles, spreading films, surface gravity waves, oscillatory flows, and linearly unstable flows leading to pattern formation. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs, complex variables and basic tensor analysis. Advanced solution methods will be taught in class as needed.
Winter 2012 - Caltech
Tues & Thurs 1:00-2:25 pm APh/Ph/Ae 116
Watson 104 Physics of Thermal and Mass Transport in Hydrodynamic Systems
12 units (3-0-9); second term
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent; APh/Ph 115 or equivalent
 
Contemporary research in many areas of physics requires some knowledge of how convective transport in fluids couples to diffusive phenomena driven by thermal or concentration gradients. This course will first examine processes driven purely by diffusion and progress toward description of systems governed by steady and unsteady convection-diffusion and reaction-diffusion equations. Topics will include Fickian dynamics, thermal transfer in Peltier devices, Lifshitz-Slyozov growth during phase separation, thermocouple measurements of oscillatory fields, reaction-diffusion phenomena in biophysical systems, buoyancy driven flows, and boundary layer formation. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs, complex variables and basic tensor analysis. Advanced solution methods such as singular perturbation, Sturm-Liouville and Green's function analysis will be taught in class as needed.
Fall 2011 - Caltech
Tues, Thurs and Fri 1:00-2:25 pm APh/Ph 115
Watson 104 Physics of Momentum Transport in Hydrodynamic Systems
12 units (3-0-9); first term
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent
 
Contemporary research in many areas of physics requires some knowledge of the principles governing hydrodynamic phenomena such as nonlinear wave propagation, symmetry breaking in pattern forming systems, phase transitions in simple and complex fluids, Langevin dynamics, sliding friction in nanoscale systems, micro- and optofluidic control, biological transport, and life at low Reynolds number. This course offers students of pure and applied physics a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of momentum transport in hydrodynamic systems. We introduce analysis techniques based on formalized dimensional analysis and rescaling, asymptotic analysis to identify dominant force balances, similitude, self-similarity and regular perturbation analysis for examining unidirectional and creeping flows, pulsatile flows, capillary phenomena, oscillating bubbles, spreading films, surface gravity waves, oscillatory flows, and linearly unstable flows leading to pattern formation. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs, complex variables and basic tensor analysis. Advanced solution methods will be taught in class as needed.
Fall '10/Winter '11 - Caltech
Tues and Thurs 1:00 - 2:25 pm (Watson 104) APh/Ph 115
Physics of Transport in Fluids
9 units (3-0-6); second and third terms
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100
 
The past decade has seen tremendous growth in applications requiring spatial and temporal modulation of small liquid structures. These include oscillating cantilevers, AFM tips, microfluidic and biodevices, optofluidic elements, quartz crystal oscillators, ink jetted DNA, lithographic printing of electronic structures and space propulsion microarrays. Development of the physics underlying these applications requires a solid grasp of transport phenomena in liquids. This course is intended to provide a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of fluid, heat and mass transport. Topics to include conservation laws and constitutive relations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, formalized methods of dimensional analysis and rescaling, identification of dominant force balances by asymptotic analysis, unidirectional and creeping flows, pulsatile flows, self-similar flows, lubrication and free surface phenomena, oscillating bubbles, spreading films, convective-diffusion processes in confined and open systems, boundary layers caused by momentum, temperature and concentration gradients, and pattern formation in linearly unstable systems. The first term will focus on fluid dynamical principles; the second term will examine phenomena triggered by thermal and concentration gradients. Students must have working knowledge of vector calculus, ODEs, PDEs and basic complex and tensor analysis. More advanced solution methods will be taught in class as required.
 
Required textbooks

Winter term
L. G. Leal, Advanced Transport Phenomena: Fluid Mechanics and Convective Transport Processes, Cambridge University Press (2007)

Fall term
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press (1998)
Fall '09/Winter '10 - Caltech
Tues and Thurs 13:00 - 14:25 (Watson 104) APh/Ph 115
Physics of Transport in Fluids
9 units (3-0-6); first and second terms
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalently, working knowledge of vector and basic tensor analysis, ODEs and PDEs
 
The past decade has seen tremendous growth in devices consisting of small components in contact with liquid media such as oscillating cantilevers and AFM tips immersed in liquids, microfluidic devices, optofluidic elements, quartz crystal oscillators, ink jetted flexible circuits and biodevices for pathogen detection. Development of such devices requires a solid grasp of the principles underlying transport phenomena in liquids. This course is intended to provide a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of fluid, heat and mass transfer. Topics to include conservation laws and constitutive relations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, formalized methods of dimensional analysis and rescaling, identification of dominant force balances by asymptotic analysis, unidirectional and creeping flows, pulsatile flows, self-similar flows, lubrication and free surface phenomena, oscillating bubbles, droplet deformation under shear, spreading films, convective-diffusion processes in confined and open systems, boundary layers caused by momentum, temperature and concentration gradients, and pattern generation in linearly unstable systems. The first term will focus on fluid dynamical principles; the second term will examine phenomena triggered by thermal and concentration gradients. Students are expected to have a reasonable grasp of vector analysis and familiarity with ODEs, simple PDEs and basic tensor analysis. More advanced analytic methods will be taught in class as needed.
 
Required textbooks

Fall term
L. G. Leal, Advanced Transport Phenomena: Fluid Mechanics and Convective Transport Processes, Cambridge University Press (2007)

Winter term
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press (1998)
Fall '08/Winter '09 - Caltech
WF 11:00 am - 12:30 pm (Watson 104) APh/Ph 115
Physics of Transport in Fluids
9 units (3-0-6); first and second terms
Prerequisites: ACM 95/100 or equivalent
 
There is considerable interest nowadays in microtechnologies consisting of small structures in contact with liquid media such as oscillating cantilevers, microfluidic arrays, optofluidic components, and biofluidic sensors, to name a few. A solid grasp of the principles governing transport phenomena in liquids is required in order to advance the development of such devices. This course will provide a self-contained treatment of the fundamentals of fluid, heat and mass transport geared toward students of pure and applied physics. Topics to include creeping and pulsatile flows, self-similar phenomena, lubrication and free surface flows, oscillating bubbles, droplet deformation, spreading films, convective-diffusion processes, and instabilities leading to pattern formation. The first term will focus on fluid dynamical principles; the second term will examine processes triggered by thermal or concentration gradients.  
Winter '08/Spring '08 - Caltech
MW 11:00 am - 12:30 pm (Watson 104) APh 150
Principles of Fluid Physics
9 units (3-0-6); second and third terms
 
The past decade has seen tremendous growth in areas of micro/nano/optofluidics, biosensing, immersion AFM, optical trapping in fluids, and MEMs flow control.  Students interested in soft condensed matter physics, biological and polymer physics, applied physics, electrical or materials engineering therefore need to develop a fundamental understanding of the physics of fluids. This course will adopt a unified approach for describing the flow of mass, momentum and heat under laminar conditions and invoke formalized methods for non-dimensionalization, rescaling, similarity transformations, and asymptotic expansions to identify the dominant force balances in various systems. Topics to include thin film and creeping flows, pulsatile motion, electrokinetic flows, viscous diffusion in moving boundary problems, drops and bubbles, convective-diffusion processes in open/confined systems, and boundary layers due to momentum, temperature or concentration gradients.  
Spring 2005 - Princeton University
MW 1:30-2:50 (EQuad A224) ChE 548
Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics: Dynamics of Films, Jets and Drops
 
The number of actuation mechanisms for generating controlled mass, momentum and energy transport in microfluidic systems continues to grow year by year. The large surface to volume ratios inherent in systems with at least one deformable interface guarantees that flow behavior can be tuned by clever manipulation of normal or tangential stresses. This course surveys current research efforts in micro- and nanofluidic systems with emphasis on free surface flows. Students will evaluate technologies, concepts and theoretical models involving transport phenomena in small scale systems by reading and critiquing recently published work in the field. A final comprehensive report will be assigned. Sample topics for this year include spontaneous electrowetting, phase field methods for problems involving moving contact lines, and dynamical instabilities driven by curved fronts.
 
Background Reading List:
A. W. Adamson and A.P. Gast, Physical Chemistry of Surfaces (6th edn)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena
V. G. Levich, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics
S. Middleman, Modeling Axisymmetric Flows
R. F. Probstein, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (2nd edn)
Spring 2004 - Princeton University
TThurs 9:30-10:50 (Friend Center 108) ChE 505
Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer
 
A comprehensive study of processes driven by heat and mass transfer. Topics to include scaling and approximation methods, steady and unsteady conduction and diffusion, forced convection in confined and unconfined laminar flows, entrance effects, Taylor dispersion, laminar boundary layers, Stefan-Maxwell equations, buoyancy driven flow, electro-osmotic flow and hydrodynamic instabilities (Rayleigh-Benard convection).
 
Sample Reading List:
R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena (1960)
E. L. Cussler, Diffusion: Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems (2nd edn, 1997)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena (1998) (class textbook)
L. G. Leal, Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis (1992)
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer: Principles of Analysis and Design (1998)
Fall 2003 - Princeton University
MWF 9:00-9:50
W 1:30-2:20 (EQuad A224)
ChE 341
Mass, Momentum and Energy Transport
 
Good engineering design begins with the development of a realistic model. This course will teach students how first to assess the importance of competing processes controlling the transport of fluids, heat and mass transfer relevant to a variety of engineering technologies. This evaluation will be followed by development of proper mathematical models and solution methods most appropriate to the task. Strong similarities exist in describing the flow behavior of heat, mass and momentum. This parallelism will be exploited to generalize understanding of systems governed by linear response. Course topics will include fluid statics; conservations equations for mass, momentum and energy; dimensional anlaysis; viscous flows at low and high Reynolds number; thermal conduction; multi-component diffusion; convective heat and mass transfer and correlations. A working knowledge of calculus, linear algebra and ordinary differential equations is assumed. MAE 305 may be taken concurrently.
 
Sample Reading List:
Welty, Wicks, Wilson and Rorrer Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer
Spring 2003 - - Princeton University
MWF 11:00-11:50 (Friend Center 112) ChE 505
Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer
 
A comprehensive study of processes driven by heat and mass transfer. Topics to include scaling and approximation methods, steady and unsteady conduction and diffusion, forced convection in confined and unconfined laminar flows, entrance effects, Taylor dispersion, laminar boundary layers, Stefan-Maxwell equations, buoyancy driven flow, electro-osmotic flow and hydrodynamic instabilities (Rayleigh-Benard convection).
 
Sample Reading List:
E. L. Cussler, Diffusion: Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems (2nd edn, 1997)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena (1998)
L. G. Leal, Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis (1992)
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer: Principles of Analysis and Design (1998)
Fall 2002 - Princeton University
MW 1:30-2:50 ChE 548
Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics: Dynamics of Films, Jets and Drops
 
The development of electronic and biomedical devices for actuating flow and mixing in micro- and nanofluidic systems requires a good understanding of the behavior of ultrasmall liquid volumes. Since small liquid structures maintain a large surface to volume ratio, their fluidic behavior is dominated by interfacial forces. This course will survey current research in micro- and nanofluidic phenomena with special emphasis on free surface flows. Students will evaluate technologies, concepts and theoretical models involving transport phenomena in small scale systems by reading and critiquing recently published work in the field.
 
Sample Reading List:
A. W. Adamson and A.P. Gast, Physical Chemistry of Surfaces (6th edn)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena
V. G. Levich, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics
S. Middleman, Modeling Axisymmetric Flows
R. F. Probstein, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (2nd edn)
Spring 2002 - Princeton University
MWF 11:00-11:50 ChE 505
Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer
 
A comprehensive study of processes driven by heat and mass transfer. Topics to include scaling and approximation methods, steady and unsteady conduction and diffusion, forced convection in confined and unconfined laminar flows, entrance effects, Taylor dispersion, laminar boundary layers, Stefan-Maxwell equations, buoyancy driven flow, electro-osmotic flow and hydrodynamic instabilities (Rayleigh-Benard convection).
 
Sample Reading List:
E. L. Cussler, Diffusion: Mass Transfer in Fluid Systems (2nd edn, 1997)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena (1998)
L. G. Leal, Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis (1992)
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer: Principles of Analysis and Design (1998)
Fall 2001 - Princeton University
MWF 11:00-11:50 MAE 305
Mathematics in Engineering I (also Mathematics 301)
 
An introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations including equations of a single variable, systems of linear equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions for ordinary and regular singular points, Laplace transforms, nonlinear equations and stability, phase portraits, boundary value problems, separation of variables, self similar solutions and Sturm-Liouville theory.
 
Sample Reading List:
G. B. Arfken and H. J. Weber, Mathematical Methods for Physicists (5th edn)
W. E. Boyce and R. C. DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems (7th edn)
G. L Peterson and J. S. Sochacki, Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
W. F. Trench, Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems
Spring 2001 - Princeton University
MW 2:30-3:50 ChE 548
Advanced Topics in Fluid Mechanics: Dynamics of Films, Jets and Drops
 
Survey of advanced theoretical and experimental topics in microscale fluid dynamics with special emphasis on free boundary flows. New microfluidic technologies like thermocapillary pumping, electrowetting, and electro-osmotic flow will be evaluated. Students are required to complement textbook assignments with weekly critiques of recently published papers in the field.
 
Sample Reading List:
A. W. Adamson and A.P. Gast, Physical Chemistry of Surfaces (6th edn)
W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena
V. G. Levich, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics
S. Middleman, Modeling Axisymmetric Flows
R. F. Probstein, Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (2nd edn)
Spring 2000 - Princeton University
MWF 11:00-11:50 MAE 305
Mathematics in Engineering I
 
Exposition of the elementary theory of ordinary differential equations with considerable discussion of the methods of solution, analysis and approximation. The student will develop facility in solving problems corresponding to ubiquitous physical phenomena in science and engineering. A working knowledge of calculus is required.
 
Sample Reading List:
Boyce and DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems (6th edn)
Fall 1999 - Princeton University
MWF 9:00-9:50
W 2:30-3:20
ChE 341
Mass, Momentum and Energy Transport
 
One of the most important aspects of engineering design lies in the development of a realistic model. We will learn how to formulate mathematical models for a broad spectrum of engineering technologies by developing the conservation equations governing the transport of mass, momentum and energy. Similarities between these different transport quantities will be exploited to gain a deeper understanding of transport phenomena in general. The course covers fluid statics and dynamics followed by heat and mass transfer problems. We also consider flow in the presence of thermal and concentration gradients.
 
Sample Reading List:
Welty, Wicks, and Wilson, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer
Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot, Transpsort Phenomena
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics
S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer
Spring 1999 - Princeton University
MW 9:30-10:50 ChE 501
Incompressible Fluid Mechanics
 
Self-contained treatment of incompressible fluid mechanics including conservation laws and constitutive relations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian flows, dimensional analysis, unidirectional and creeping flows, self-similar flows, asymptotic approximations to complex flows, and lubrication and boundary layer phenomena. Time permitting, we introduce concepts and approximations relevant to hydrodynamics instabilities and turbulent flows. Familiarity with vector analysis and solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations is assumed.
 
Sample Reading List:
L. Gary Leal, Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Process
G. K. Batchelor, An Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
Landau and Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (2nd edn)
D. J. Tritton, Physical Fluid Dynamics (2nd edn)